Black Friday (November 25) never beheld so prominent like this year; probably we missed the usual signs on a festival spell, which attracts huge crowds.

By Das Sreedharan
Express News Service

Black Friday (November 25) never beheld so prominent like this year; probably we missed the usual signs on a festival spell, which attracts huge crowds. This shopping holiday is the day following Thanksgiving and the beginning of Christmas shopping season, and has become such a popular outing in the US, Canada and the UK. It’s always a great sign of a sound economy to see people in the street, enjoy their shopping and gently stroll towards restaurants for an early dinner.

At the restaurant, people were queuing up for dinner. We noticed an Indian couple with shopping bags who appeared in a hurry to eat fast and get out. Their meal order was simple and precise, essentially individual choices, and included one veg and non-veg starter and main course. When the food arrived, it was clear to see a rift between them. They ate their own dishes like strangers, nothing abnormal until we observed a small dispute.

We are used to seeing arguments in restaurants, mostly waiters with chefs in the kitchen. Seldom couples take over the show, which invites attention from the service team. The problem here was the vegetarian wife looked uncomfortable with a heavily carnivore husband eating meat in front of her. Soon, the man’s voice bounced over

A R Rahman’s romantic melody playing above their table. We heard the husband say, “You are selfish, only thinking about your likes. Look around, everyone’s eating mixed meals and they all cope with what others eat.”

Whilst we served the main course, the lady looked at him as if she wanted to say, “Have I asked you not to eat what you like?” As her silence grew more intense, the man climbed on it rapidly with a series of complaints and accusations related to older stories and irrelevant subjects. In her eyes a flash of truth reflected, and she expressed her ability to endure the situation to avoid a much louder debate. We find similar discomfort with a lot of Indian couples, especially of the earlier generation, where the guys eat everything and women remain traditionally vegetarian. Most of the time they get used to it quietly; we hardly hear women complain in public like this.